Top Ten Most Convincing Reasons To Drink Coffee

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Coffee is one of the most widely consumed beverages in the world. According to the history of global coffee trade, the coffee bean plant is thought to have been discovered in the northeast region of Ethiopia, with coffee cultivation expanding to the Arab world, and then to Yemen. Coffee then spread to India, Italy, to the rest of Europe, Indonesia, and the Americas.

A growing body of research shows that coffee drinkers are less likely to have type 2 diabetes, Parkinson’s disease, and dementia, and have fewer cases of certain cancers, heart rhythm problems, and strokes. Donald Hensrud, M.D., claims that for most people the health benefits outweigh the risks.

10. Coffee Consumption Associated with Milder Fibrosis in Patients with Chronic Liver Diseases
[See Study]
According to a study published by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases, caffeine intake of 300 mg/day (2.2 cups of coffee daily) was associated with reduced fibrosis compared to lesser amounts or no caffeine intake. The effect of caffeine was even more pronounced in patients with HCV. HCV patients with caffeine intake 300 mg/d were 88% less likely to have advanced fibrosis than patients with lower consumption.

9. Coffee Consumption Associated With Decreased Risk of Skin Cancer
[See Study]
Caffeine could be related to an inverse association between basal cell carcinoma risk and consumption of coffee, a study found. The prospective study, presented at the 10th AACR International Conference on Frontiers in Cancer Prevention Research, held Oct. 22-25, 2011, examined the risks of basal cell carcinoma (BCC), squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and melanoma in connection with coffee consumption and found a decreased risk for BCC only.

8. Coffee Consumption Associated With Lower Serum Uric Acid Level
[See Study]
According to a study by the Arthritis Research Center of Canada, Vancouver General Hospital, University of British Columbia, findings from a nationally representative sample of US adults suggest that coffee consumption is associated with lower serum uric acid level and hyperuricemia frequency, but tea consumption is not. The inverse association with coffee appears to be via components of coffee other than caffeine.

7. Coffee Drinkers Are 35 Percent Less Likely to Have Type 2 Diabetes
[See Study]
This systematic review supports the hypothesis that habitual coffee consumption is associated with a substantially lower risk of type 2 diabetes. Longer-term intervention studies of coffee consumption and glucose metabolism are warranted to examine the mechanisms underlying the relationship between coffee consumption and type 2 diabetes.

6. Coffee Consumption Associated with Reduced Risk of Advanced Prostate Cancer
[See Study] Data presented at the American Association for Cancer Research Frontiers in Cancer Prevention Research Conference revealed a strong inverse association between coffee consumption and the risk of lethal and advanced prostate cancers.

“Coffee has effects on insulin and glucose metabolism as well as sex hormone levels, all of which play a role in prostate cancer. It was plausible that there may be an association between coffee and prostate cancer,” said Kathryn M. Wilson, Ph.D., a postdoctoral fellow at the Channing Laboratory, Harvard Medical School and the Harvard School of Public Health.

5. Coffee Reduces Chance of Developing Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus
[See Study]
Consumption of hot tea or coffee is associated with a lower likelihood of nasal carriage for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). The findings raise the possibility of a promising new method to decrease MRSA nasal carriage that is safe, inexpensive, and easily accessible.

4. Coffee Consumption May Help to Prevent Cirrhosis
[See Study]
“There is an ingredient in coffee that protects against cirrhosis, especially alcoholic cirrhosis,” write the authors of the seven-year study. “In contrast to results for coffee, no effect was observed for drinking tea.”

3. Coffee Drinking Men Are Less likely To Have Parkinson’s Disease
[See Study]
Men who regularly drank caffeinated coffee (3-6 cups) had a significantly lower risk of Parkinson’s disease death than did noncoffee drinkers. Among women who never used estrogens, the risk of Parkinson’s disease death was lower in women who habitually drank caffeinated coffee than in never drinkers.

2. Drinking Coffee Reduces Stroke Risk by 25 percent
[See Study]
A 10-year study revealed coffee consumption was associated with a statistically significant lower risk of total stroke, cerebral infarction, and subarachnoid hemorrhage but not intracerebral hemorrhage. Drinking one to five cups of coffee per day reduces your risk of having a stroke by as much as 25 percent.

1. Women Who Drink Coffee Are Less Likely to be Clinically Depressed
[See Study]
Women who drink four cups of coffee per day are 20 percent less likely to be clinically depressed than women who drink only one cup of coffee per week. “Depression risk decreases with increasing caffeinated coffee consumption, according to the scholars whose study conducted on 50,739 women.”

(Hat Tip to Anneli Rufus with the Daily Beast).

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Spence Cooper
Inquisitive foodie with a professional investigative background and strong belief in the organic farm to table movement. Author of Bad Seeds: A FriendsEAT Guide to GMO's. Buy Now!
Spence Cooper

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