Care to Guess Where Chips Ahoy! American Summer Cookies Are Made?

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It seems the good people at The Impulsive Buy, a website dedicated to providing quasi-reviews about various consumer goods, are somewhat miffed after purchasing Chips Ahoy! American Summer cookies.

“When I bought the Chips Ahoy! American Summer cookies,” writes Marva, “I thought I was about to get my America on. But my raging patriotism turned into dismay when I found out the cookies were made in Mexico.

“If your name has America in it,” adds Marva, “you better be made in America, just like Los Angeles-born actress America Ferrera.

Nothing is made in America anymore, Marva. It’s a sign of the (global) times. Chips Ahoy! cookies debuted in 1963 and are made by Nabisco, originally known as National Biscuit Company, headquartered in East Hanover, New Jersey, and founded in 1898.

But Nabisco doesn’t even own Nabisco anymore. Nabisco is owned by Kraft Foods, Inc., and Kraft markets their many brands in more than 155 countries.

Nabisco also makes Ritz Crackers, a brand of snack cracker introduced by Nabisco in 1934. Ritz Crackers are made in Mexico too.

Another stalwart piece of Americana, The Hershey Company, linked with U.S. candymaking for more than a century, closed multiple plants in 2007, cutting its workforce by nearly 12 percent, sending U.S. jobs to a new plant in Monterey, Mexico.

Marva says that on the Chips Ahoy! American Summer packaging, it says it’s ‘Crammed with Joy,’ “but it’s really chocolate chips: red, white, and blue candy coated fudge pieces, and disappointment crammed into a cookie that’s the same size as the regular version.

“My displeasure with these cookies stem from the fact that they don’t taste any different from regular non-patriotic Chips Ahoy!”

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Spence Cooper
Inquisitive foodie with a professional investigative background and strong belief in the organic farm to table movement. Author of Bad Seeds: A FriendsEAT Guide to GMO's. Buy Now!
Spence Cooper

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