Cabernet Franc: Grape Versatility At Its Finest

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If you’re a wine lover, you definitely wouldn’t miss a sip or two of a good glass of Cabernet Franc wines. Well, most of the time it is used to blend with famous wines such as the Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlot, but rarely gets attention for standing alone.

The Cabernet Franc grape variety is a member of the black grape family. This global grape variety is one of world’s most famous grapes grown to produce most fine red wines. According to the history book, Cabernet Franc is said to trace its roots in a southwest region of France during the 17th century. The vines were first planted and grown at the Abbey of Bourgueil, and when 18th and 19th century came, Cabernet Sauvignon rose to fame, with the blending of Cabernet Franc to Sauvignon blanc, producing Cabernet Sauvignon wines.

The Bordeaux region seem to be a faithful terroir to the Cabernet Franc variety as this region has abundant planting of this popular grape. The Cabernet Franc is a grape that is easy to work with as it easily adapts to different kinds of vineyard soil. The grapes bud early in the season, with groups of small blue-black colored and thin-skinned berries. As compared to the Cabernet Sauvignon, the Cabernet Franc has bigger chances of mutation. But there’s no need to worry about this. It just proves that wine makers have found the efficiency and importance of growing this grape variety in producing world-class wines. California also recognized and embraced the varietal into its own wine regions, and started producing their own Cabernet Franc wines, as not just a blending wine. New York, with its slightly cooler climate also took the idea of growing its own Cabernet Franc grapes, more so in the area of Long Island where some of the best are produced.

The Cabernet Franc may have played a supporting role as a blending grape for its rather famous partners, the Sauvignon blanc and Merlot but the value of Cabernet Franc doesn’t end here. The young Cabernet Franc makes pale red wine, slightly more aromatic and fruity-flavored with hints of berries, herbs, and currants. It’s like a younger version of a Cabernet Sauvignon, in which the tannins could help in aging the wine, making it versatile whether the grape is young or a little aged. It produces great wines minus the strong oak flavors and alcohol, balanced by its fruity flavors, tannin and acidity that has a refreshing acidity to the palate.

A blending wine, a stand alone wine, or an ice wine, the Cabernet Franc surely has grown to be a gorgeous grape variety. For its remarkable versatility and light and fruity characteristics, no wonder wine lovers have been having a great time with wines that are produced from Cabernet Franc grapes.

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Blanca Valbuena
I am one of the co-founders of FriendsEAT. Obviously, I love to eat. Other passions include A Song of Ice and Fire, Shakespeare, Dostoyevski, and Aldous Huxley.
Blanca Valbuena
Blanca Valbuena

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