Traveling Through India’s Street Foods

1x1.trans Traveling Through India’s Street FoodsTravel to India and get to know the cities through their beautiful sites, and have a deeper understanding of their culture via their street foods. Indians are known to create different kinds of spices that are made with native ingredients. Surprisingly, most Indian street foods contain vegetables that are locally produced. Pack your bags and let your tummies roar for a different side of street food wonders courtesy of India.

1x1.trans Traveling Through India’s Street FoodsPani Puri. Aside from the street food staple, Vada Pav, India has a wide array of street food treats for local and international foodies. Pani Puri, also known as Golgappa, is a famous street food in India. It is made with a crispy hollow pastry with a mixture of flour, tamarind, chaat masala (spice mix), onion, potato, chickpeas, and water. The size of an ordinary Pani Puri is just enough to fit a foodie’s mouth. Its filling also vary from region to region. You can fill it with yogurt, mashed potato, been sprouts – just about anything you desire. Have a side trip to taste of Pani Puri while strolling along the streets of India.

1x1.trans Traveling Through India’s Street FoodsPav bhaj. It is more of a fast food staple that is native to Maharashtra, but are is popularly sold at India’s metropolitan area like Mumbai. Pav bhaji is basically a bun with mixed vegetable curry on the side. The bhaji (vegetable dish) is made with a potato-based curry mix with different chopped veggies like tomatoes, onion, carrots, and a splash of lemon, with a baked pav (bun) on the side. Nowadays, there are many variations of this street food wonder, there are more meaty and veggie options to choose from. This can be eaten as a snack or as a full meal and is widely found in kiosks, carts, even in restaurants and fast foods. Have a heart for India, have an appetite for Pav Bhaji.

1x1.trans Traveling Through India’s Street FoodsAloo Tikki. Vegetarians, hear me out. If you happen to be in India, looking for a cheap find in the streets of India, you might wanna look for Aloo tikki. This is a very popular Northern Indian staple, a potato-based patty with coriander leaves, onions, chilis, and bread crumbs. Mumbai’s version of this street food is serving it with a spicy curry and chutneys on the side and is called Ragda pattice. You can dish it as it is or put make a sandwiches with it. Either way, aloo tikki is just right for your budget and for your stomach.

1x1.trans Traveling Through India’s Street FoodsSamosas. Here’s another famous vegetarian food for those scouring the streets for something new to excite their palates. Samosas are pastries that may be stuffed with onions, coriander, spiced potatoes, lentils, peas and ground beef or chicken. It is fried or baked in a triangular form and is usually served with a chutney. They are widely available in the streets of India. What a nice way to know what India has to offer for a swinging foodie.

1x1.trans Traveling Through India’s Street FoodsBhel Puri. And finally, there’s rice. But wait, this street food treat is considered a snack as well. Bhel Puri is a dish made with puffed rice, tomatoes, potato, cucumber with a splash of tangy sauce. This is made to be consumed immediately as the juices from the ingredients may overpower the real flavors of this dish and may even make them soggy. These are commonly found on roadstalls and mini shops in India.

1x1.trans Traveling Through India’s Street Foods
I am one of the co-founders of FriendsEAT. Obviously, I love to eat. Other passions include A Song of Ice and Fire, Shakespeare, Dostoyevski, and Aldous Huxley.
1x1.trans Traveling Through India’s Street Foods

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