Demographics-of-People-on-Food-Stamps-(Image-via-gubu-world.blogspot
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According to the USDA, the number of Americans using Food Stamps via the Supplemental nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), rose in December of 2011 to a now-historic high of 46,514,238, an increase of more than a quarter million Americans from November’s new revised total of 46,286,316.

That means 1 in 7 Americans is on Food Stamps, the highest since Obama took office, prompting Newt Gingrich to refer to Obama as “the best food-stamp president in American history.”

The government spent $6.22 billion on Food Stamps in December, with participation in the program up 5.5% from a year earlier. Zero Hedge reported last November that all states have seen at least a 3% sequential increase in food stamp usage.

According to a USDA pdf report: “The Face of SNAP Participants”, in 2010, application data showed the following breakdown:

* 34% were whites;
* 22% were African-Americans;
* 16% were Hispanic;
* 3% were Asian; and
* 4% were Native American.
* For 20%, race/ethnicity was not reported.

Many SNAP participants had jobs.

Nearly 30 percent of SNAP households had earnings and 41 percent of all SNAP participants lived in a household that had earnings. Jobs were the primary source of income for most of these households.

Most SNAP participants were children, elderly or disabled.

* Nearly half (47 percent) were under age 18;
* 8 percent were age 60 or older.
* Nearly 20 percent of SNAP households contained a person with disabilities.

One of the most important transformations over the last 20 years is a fundamental shift in income from welfare to work. In 1990, 42 percent of all SNAP households received cash welfare benefits and only 19 percent had earnings. In 2010, only 8 percent received cash welfare, while 30 percent had earnings.

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Spence Cooper
Inquisitive foodie with a professional investigative background and strong belief in the organic farm to table movement. Author of Bad Seeds: A FriendsEAT Guide to GMO's. Buy Now!
Spence Cooper

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